Category: Adoption

Different Types Of Adoption

Different Types Of Adoption

By | Adoption, PreConception | No Comments

Concerned regarding how much time a domestic adoption takes? Discover your various paths when considering expanding your family by way of adoption.
Before I begin, let me state that I do not have ulterior motives regarding what type of adoption is ideal or even if it is the optimal option for everyone trying to start a family. Forming a family is a personal thing that varies family to family, and no one route is the best for everyone.
Domestic adoption
One of the difficulties in attempting to offer an overview about domestic adoption of newborns (also referred to as relinquishment programs on behalf of the birth parent) is that the time they take varies in relation to how aggressively the potential parents try to connect with pregnant women thinking about making an adoption plan. There are some general trends, however.
The child that takes the longest to adopt is a Caucasian female who is low-risk. (Meaning she is low risk for exposure to tobacco, alcohol, drugs when in utero; low risk for genetic medical or mental health problems; and low risk for legal issues. This more often than not involves an unknown father.) The adoption wait time is typically shorter if you select a child of non-Caucasian race, one with higher risk factors, or a boy. An African-American male or infants who were exposed to drugs or alcohol when in the womb have the shortest wait time.
Foster care adoption
A pressing need exists for adoptions out of the foster care system— approximately 130,000 children currently await adoption. Speaking generally, two ways exist to adopt from the foster care system: either you might adopt from a foster home or you might foster to adopt. In the first option, kids are legally free (their parents have no legal claim to them) and staying in foster homes or group homes until they find an adoptive family. Usually, it takes a long time — on average 39 months. They are on average 8 years of age and statistics of race and gender are split down the middle (Caucasian, African-American, and if geographically relevant, Latino). The majority of adoptive families are subsidized monthly post adoption to cover some expenses. Some states cover college tuition.
The other way to adopt via the fostering system is by fostering to adopt. Because the mission of the system is to reunite families, selecting this route runs the risk of down the road returning the child to their parents. Families looking to adopt foster these children until it is decided whether or not the kid is better off with them or their birth family. If it isn’t in their best interest, their foster family can adopt them. The large majority of the kids that are younger (children age five and under) and adopted through foster care get adopted by way of the foster to adopt program.
Honestly, certain states and even other counties do a superior job when it comes to selecting children to place in these foster-to-adopt programs. Many aim for those children wherein there is a sound chance that familial reunification is not going to occur, while others don’t bother to take these precautions. Most families I interact with were able to foster and then adopt, though instances do exist in which the child or children they fostered were reunited with their birth family.